De Addis Abeba a Ciudad del Cabo (From Addis Ababa to Cape Town)


Southern Africa!
February 27, 2012, 6:00 am
Filed under: Uncategorized

We’ve finally made it to Southern Africa (which means we’re in the same time zone as South Africa – which also means we’re getting close!) and Malawi’s our first stop.

After four days of nearly non-stop travel from Tanzania via a ferry, overnight train and countless hours on numerous buses we’re now in Nkatha Bay, a pretty little spot along Lake Malawi.

We’ve not yet had much of a chance to enjoy or explore our surroundings as it’s been raining quite a bit and I’ve not been able to move much (I twisted my foot – while still carrying my backpack – walking down some stairs looking for a place to stay on the day we arrived so it’s been swollen and purple and bandaged up since Friday night. Thankfully it now seems to be on the mend.)

Internet, mobile phone connections and electricity seem to be a bit erratic and we’re planning to head to Chidzimulu and Likoma Islands later tonight for about a week so it may be a while until we’re in touch again.

But we’re both ok (a bit tired but after a few days’ rest we hope all will be good again) and will fill you in on our last few days in Zanzibar and tell you about our Swahili cooking course as soon as we have a better connection.

Advertisements


P is for paradise in Paje (and beyond) – Part two
February 17, 2012, 7:49 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

We hired a Vespa for the day yesterday (and christened her Maya) so we could explore a little more of the island. After a few mishaps at the beginning of the trip (which included getting the wheel stuck in the sand causing me to fly off the back and land quite hard on my bum – lucky for me my African bum affords me a lot of cushioning so I don’t even think I have a bruise today), we had a really good day and saw some more beautiful sights.

Here they come!

Here they come!

The pilot . . .

The pilot . . .

and his co-pilot (and cargo)

and his co-pilot (and cargo)

Our first stop was Kizimkazi, a small fishing village about 30km south of Paje.  The main reason people go to the village is to arrange a boat trip to swim with the bottlenose dolphins.  However we were pretty content just to swim in the sea (it’s a beautiful little spot) and leave the dolphins in peace.

Beautiful Kizimkazi

Beautiful Kizimkazi

Kizimkazi

Kizimkazi

A Kizimkazi cave

A Kizimkazi cave

Agua Brava - part 2!

Agua Brava - part 2!

Taking in my surroundings

Taking in my surroundings

On our way back up north to Michamvi (20km from Paje) we stopped off for lunch at Kiddo’s Cafe in the middle of Jambiani village (only 2.5km from our guesthouse) as it had been recommended to us by someone we’d met in Paje – we definitely weren’t disappointed and only wished we’d hired the scooter earlier so we could have enjoyed the delights of the cafe sooner. In addition to the stunning location, the food was delicious and filling too. I had muesli for lunch (I know, maybe a strange choice but it was also recommended and it was oh so good) with raisins, fresh pineapple and mango and roasted cashews to add to the mix and Alberto gorged on fish and tasty vegetables (the fish deal was eat as much as you like for about £4 but he could only manage one serving). We enjoyed it so much – and I needed to taste the fish for myself – that we ended up going back for dinner a few hours later :-)

Kiddo’s is attached to a gorgeous little guesthouse – Mango Beachhouse (it only has three rooms) – which is owned by a German lady (the house used to be her own private home before she converted it to a guesthouse three years ago) and we said that if we ever come back to Zanzibar, we’d definitely stay there.

Our lunch spot, Kiddo's Cafe

Our lunch spot, Kiddo's Cafe

The view from Kiddo's Cafe

The view from Kiddo's Cafe

Today’s our last day on the beach so we spent it in just about the same way as we’ve spent most of the others – being quite lazy and not doing very much! I spotted these kids playing just a few metres from where we were having lunch at Paje Beach Restaurant and Lounge (another great place for food – it’s a very basic set up but the chef does wonders with the simplest of ingredients) and couldn’t help but take a picture.

Kids swinging from an old boat on Paje beach

Kids swinging from an old boat on Paje beach

Tomorrow it’s back to Stone Town (can’t wait) for three days to explore some more and learn how to make a good pilau on a Swahili cooking course. Then we start the next adventure to Malawi (only about 7-8 weeks before we think we’ll cross the border into South Africa!).

Enjoy your weekends and we’ll send more news soon.



P is for paradise in Paje – part one
February 14, 2012, 8:05 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

Now we’re in Paje, a little piece of paradise on the east coast of Zanzibar. The sand is blindingly white and the sea is a multitude of blues and greens that shimmer in the sunlight. At low tide the sea seems to disappear, leaving the dhows stranded in an endless expanse of sand amidst crystal clear pools of water that ripple in the wind. Aaahhh . . .

x

A stranded dhow

Seaweed farm

Seaweed farm

Going to collect seaweed

Off to collect seaweed

Our guesthouse is right on the beach so after a late breakfast we normally stretch out on the loungers under the palm trees until it’s time for lunch, when we then walk further down the beach to Paje village, about 1.5km away. With full bellies, we take a slow walk back to the guesthouse, stopping to rest and cool down in the pools along the way, gazing out at the sea in the distance and watching the kite surfers whirl by.

Paje kitesurfers

Paje kitesurfers

Just a monkey clowning around :-p

Clowning around :-p

Chill time

Chill time

Today we went snorkelling out by a nearby reef. We were due to get the tail end of a cyclone that’s hit Mozambique so the water was pretty rough! Saw some cool fish but the highlight for me was the dhow boat trip – I love those boats! Now Alberto wants to take up sailing (maybe to go with his pirate-like appearance of late) – reckon he’ll be able to manage a dhow in the Cape winds and seas?

Our ship awaits us

Our ship awaits us

Los capitanes

Los capitanes

1st Mate

1st Mate

We’re hiring a Vespa in a few days’ time to explore some of the coast so more pictures to follow soon.

P.S. Hope you all had a happy Valentine’s Day and Keags, hope you had a brilliant birthday!

A corny Valentine's Day picture

A corny Valentine's Day picture



Jambo tena! (Hello again!)
February 14, 2012, 7:26 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

Another border crossing – quite an easy one this time – and we made it back into Swahili speaking country. We spent one and a half days in Bukoba, a pleasant enough town on the shore of Lake Victoria, waiting for the overnight ferry that would take us across to Mwanza from where we hoped to catch a two day train to Dar es Salaam. To pass the time, I had a haircut for 75p by a lady who although was very sweet, I don’t think I was her usual type of client! Thankfully my hair has started growing again and each day I’m looking a bit less like a boy who had a fight with a pair of scissors and lost . . .

After possibly one of the best night’s sleep in a while on the ferry, we arrived in Mwanza (the size of Lake Victoria is overwhelming – it took us over 9 hours to just cross one corner of the lake) to learn the train line had been suspended. Much to my relief, instead of taking three days’ worth of buses and maybe trains (if they were running further down the line), we decided to fly the 90 mins to Dar where we whiled away the days at Mikadi Beach Lodge (just south of Dar across the harbour) waiting for Alberto’s Mozambican visa – check out Alberto’s last post with the hunky pirate photos of himself to see what I’m talking about ;-).

It took five days of lazing on the beach, eating good food and going snorkelling on a deserted island until Alberto’s visa was ready and then finally it was time for what I’d been excitedly waiting for (probably for the last seven-eight years) – Zanzibar!

Stone Town

Stone Town

The famous Zanzibar doors, once a symbol of wealth

The famous Zanzibar doors, once a symbol of wealth

Stone Town (which is the older and much more interesting part of Zanzibar Town) is fantastic – it’s got heaps of history, lots of old and dilapidated but beautiful buildings with shutters on the windows and solid, intricately carved Zanzibar doors dating from the time of the Sultans plus a bit of Portuguese architectural influence, mysterious maze-like alleys that twist and turn and gorgeous little shops full of lots of pretty things. The food’s delicious too – juicy fish in coconut sauce, Zanzibar pizzas (kind of like a small crepe but filled with a choice of chicken, beef, cheese and tomato or even peanut butter, banana and Nutella and then fried – yum!) from Forodhani Gardens along the waterfront and good Italian ice-cream from a little restaurant overlooking the sea – my mouth’s watering already . . .

The roofs of Stone Town with the spires of the Catholic Cathedral in the distance

The roofs of Stone Town with the spires of the Catholic cathedral in the distance

One of many winding alleys

One of the many mysterious alleys in the old town

Watching the world go by

Watching the world go by

Stone Town seaside

Stone Town seaside

The Portuguese arch

The Portuguese arch

Our second (and last before going to the beach) night in Stone Town was also the start of an annual four night music festival in Zanzibar called Sauti za Busara. This year was the first whereby only musicians from Africa were invited to play (including Tumi and the Volume from South Africa who were one of the final acts on the last night). The venue for the festival was pretty special – inside the walls of the old fort under the moonlit sky.

The old fort

The grounds of the old fort

Our favourite acts on that first night included a group of kids from a local orphanage performing traditional dances and songs and a guy from Cape Verde who was pretty funky and got us all up on our feet. Funnily enough we weren’t that keen on one of the groups whose routine included rolling around on the floor in what looked like an attempt to exorcise demons while the women shrieked and some of the male members paraded around with a live chicken, which they later pretended to bite in two. Apparently the festival did get better as it progressed . .

After our week on the beach we’re back in Stone Town for a few days before we start making our way towards Malawi and I can’t wait to explore the town some more.



Tirados en Mikadi Beach
February 13, 2012, 7:28 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

En Dar Es Salaam teníamos mucho trabajo que hacer, ya que era el sitio adecuado para preparar el viaje a Zanzibar, el tren a Malawi, y mi visado para Mozambique. Simone había leído en un blog acerca de un sitio cerca de Dar donde podíamos acampar en la playa, al otro lado del puerto de Dar Es Salaam. El sitio se llama Mikadi Beach y sería nuestro hogar durante cinco días mientras lo arreglábamos todo.

Para llegar a Mikadi Beach se coge un ferry desde el puerto de Dar que cruza al otro lado del mismo, un viaje de doscientos metros en el que pasas de la capital de Tanzanía a pueblecitos de pescadores y playas de arena blanca. Lo único que nos recordaba que estabas cerca de la ciudad eran las recomendaciones de no pasear por la playa y los seguratas masai, por un lado, y cargueros enormes con cientos de contenedores pasando de cuando en cuando detrás de las palmeras.

Dar Es Salaam desde el ferry a Kigamboni

Dar Es Salaam desde el ferry a Kigamboni

Mikadi Beach desde la piscina

Mikadi Beach desde la piscina

Una banda en Mikadi Beach

Nuestra habitación

Poco que hacer excepto balancearse en la hamaca y ver pasar los veleros

Poco que hacer excepto balancearse en la hamaca y ver pasar los veleros

La playa

La playa

Los guardias masai jugando al futbol

Los guardias masai jugando al futbol

Teníamos unos cuantos días que matar mientras abrían la embajada mozambiqueña así que uno de los días nos fuímos en un dhow (los barcos típicos de por aquí) a una isla deshabitada enfrente. La isla era del material del que están hechos los reportajes del National Geographic, un agua de un color y una claridad increible, arena blanca sin pisadas de otras personas, y conchas y estrellas de mar enormes por todas partes.

De paseo en un dhow

De paseo en un dhow

Agua Brava

Agua Brava

Una playa para nosotros solos

Una playa para nosotros solos

El cangrejo ermitaño más grande que he visto nunca

El cangrejo ermitaño más grande que he visto nunca

Una estrella de mar, grande como un plato

Una estrella de mar, grande como un plato

Cuando por fín llegó el lunes dejamos nuestro pequeño paraíso y fuímos a Dar a por billetes de tren a Malawi para el día 21 y a por mi visa, que nos haría quedarnos otros tres días mientras tenían mi pasaporte en la embajada. Hay peores sitios para quedarse tirado esperando un visado.



Camino a Dar Es Salaam
February 4, 2012, 5:19 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

Tras Lake Bunyonyi, estabamos impacientes por empezar la segunda parte del viaje. La primera ha sido toda de interior, la montañas del norte de Etiopía, el desierto al sur de Etiopía y el norte de Kenya, los lagos del valle del Rift, las llanuras del Masai Mara, el nacimiento del Nilo y Lago Victoria, y las montañas al oeste de Uganda, bordeando el Congo y Ruanda.

La segunda va a ser mar y playa: Dar Es Salaam, Zanzibar, en ferry a lo largo de Lake Malawi, las playas desde el sur de Mozambique hasta Durban en Sudáfrica. Pero para ello primero tenemos que llegar a Dar Es Salaam desde el oeste de Uganda, unos 1500Km que podrían llevarnos una semana entera.

El primer día fuímos en autobús hasta la última parada en Uganda, Masaka. Poco más que una parada en el camino a Tanzania, en la que aprovechamos para comprar comida y productos de aseo para el viaje. Y también nos alojamos en el hotel con el nombre más sugerente de África, el Hot Ram Motel, que se puede traducir como Motel Cabrón Caliente. A pesar de lo que podais pensar el sitio no es un prostíbulo, y de hecho era muy limpio, comfortable y tranquilo.

Hot Ram Motel

Hot Ram Motel

Al día siguiente contratamos un taxi hasta la frontera con Tanzania y cambiamos de país sin ningún problema. Conseguimos un visado, cambiar el dinero y transporte hasta la siguiente ciudad en media hora, lo que seguramente es un récord.

En la frontera con Tanzania

En la frontera con Tanzania

Nada más cruzar a Tanzania nos dimos cuenta de que debe ser el país más rico y civilizado de nuestra ruta. Todo el mundo es simpático y educado, no hay basura en las calles, los coches y edificios son nuevos y reciben mantenimiento. Y encima parece más barato que Uganda, ¡Nos encanta Tanzania!

Fuímos a Bukoba para coger el ferry que cruza el Lago Victoria hasta Mwanza. Tal vez el único ferry que queda en el lago ya que desde tiempos coloniales no se bota ninguno nuevo y de vez en cuando alguno se hunde con una burrada de ahogados. No me extrañaría que en unos pocos años arreglen la carretera entre Bukoba y Mwanza y el ferry desaparezca.

Bukoba es un buen sitio para quedarse tirado unos días esperando al ferry, con los billetes en la mano no teníamos más que hacer que beber cervezas heladas, o no tanto, en la playa. Dar paseos por la ciudad fotografiando antiguas casas coloniales, y disfrutar de un país donde por fin saben lo que son las especias.

El segundo día el ferry nos despertó tocando la sirena al entrar en el puerto, y al anochecer embarcamos junto con unas cuantas toneladas de plátanos camino de Mwanza. Nuestra cabina era muy cómoda, con las mejores almohadas de África (probablemente importadas, todas las que hemos usado han sido horribles). Se hizo de noche enseguida y al amanecer estabamos ya muy cerca de Mwanza, que parecía muy bonita encaramada en las colinas con bloques de granito por todas partes.

Spice Beach Hotel en Bukoba

Spice Beach Hotel en Bukoba

Casa colonial en Bukoba

Casa colonial en Bukoba

Mezquita en Bukoba

Mezquita en Bukoba

MV Victoria

MV Victoria

La dama de las bananas

La dama de las bananas

Amanecer desde el MV Victoria

Amanecer desde el MV Victoria

Entrando a Mwanza

Entrando a Mwanza

El MV Victoria y su carga

El MV Victoria y su carga

En Mwanza el objetivo era conseguir una cabina en el tren que va hasta Dar Es Salaam, 1000Km a traves de Tanzania interior, pero en la estación nos dieron malas noticias. Había problemas en la vía entre MWanza y Tabora, seguramente desde hacía meses, y el tren no saldría hasta dentro de un par de meses o más.

Tras desayunar una tortilla de patatas idéntica a la que hacemos en España, pero que ellos llaman chipsi maiyi, decidimos que no eramos tan duros como para tirarnos tres días de viaje en autobús a través de Tanzania, sin nada interesante que ver en el camino, y decidimos ir en avión usando el Easyjet africano, fly540. Fue triste quedarnos sin viaje de dos días en tren, pero al menos podríamos llorar nuestras penas en la playa.

Estación de tren en Mwanza

Estación de tren en Mwanza

Hasta usan el mismo color que EasyJet

Hasta usan el mismo color que EasyJet

Dar Es Salaam es una ciudad que nos parece muy agradable, con preciosas casas coloniales, una fuerte influencia india, arabe y asiática, y todas las comodidades de la ciudad, que se agradecen después de tanto viaje.

Dar Es Salaam

Dar Es Salaam

El próximo post lo escribiremos dentro de unos días, pero aquí hay una foto que tomó Simone ayer.

Mikadi Beach

Mikadi Beach



Ultimos días en Byoona Amagara
February 4, 2012, 5:00 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

Un post corto para añadir un par de fotos de los últimos días en Byoona Amagara. Uno de los días fuímos a Bushara Island, donde había un hotel que servía carne en el restaurante, ya que tras varios días a base de pescado y gambas en nuestra isla me moría por un filete. Después de comer remamos un poco para acercarnos a Punishment Island, donde abandonaban a su suerte a las solteras embarazadas hace no tanto tiempo. El sitio es bastante siniestro, la verdad.

Punishment Island

Punishment Island

El último día el lago estaba tranquilo como una balsa de aceite, y cogimos la canoa sólo para remar lejos de tierra y disfrutar del silencio, África puede ser bastante ruidosa a veces.

El lago como un espejo

El lago como un espejo

Después nos acercamos a tierra firme para subir a una colina con buenas vistas del lago. Parece mentira lo cerca que parecen estar las islas unas de otras y la de tiempo que se tarda en remar entre ellas. La isla que se ve más cercana es Itambira, donde esta Byoona Amagara. Justo detrás está Bwama, la isla más grande del lago y la que tiene una iglesia en su punto más alto. Detrás de Bwama y a la derecha esta Bushara, justo detrás, no visible en la foto, esta Punishment, y detrás a la izquierda hay otras islas que fuímos otro día pero de las que no recuerdo el nombre. La isla más a la derecha pertenece al Banco de Uganda, y supongo que la usan para sobornar a gente poderosa, y de las muchas otras islas en el lago no tengo ni idea, pero estoy seguro de que todas tienen sus propias historias.

Varias de las islas de Lake Bunyonyi

Varias de las islas de Lake Bunyonyi