De Addis Abeba a Ciudad del Cabo (From Addis Ababa to Cape Town)


My beloved country
March 22, 2012, 4:48 pm
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South Africa. Home. We made it. Ok, we’re not yet at our final destination, Cape Town, but we’ve survived Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Malawi and Mozambique. And I can honestly say give me the challenge of running another Comrades over backpacking through Africa any day!

And as a welcome home gift, I’ve been diagnosed with a bacterial infection (the dizziness and vomiting started as soon as we crossed the South African border – great timing) and I spent my first few hours in Nelspruit at the doctor’s with a drip in my arm while blood tests were being done. I’ve been given lots of drugs and have just popped a few and had some yoghurt and they seem to be doing the trick. Fingers crossed.

So far, our trip’s been tough and it’s been emotional but we’ve seen and shared some amazing things (and some not so amazing things!) along the way and had loads of fun but now we need a holiday. And that’s exactly what we’re going to have as we make our way to our final destination, Cape Town (but this time in style – in our very own rental car!).

More news about our adventures in my beloved country to follow.

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Country no. 6 – Mozambique
March 22, 2012, 4:38 pm
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Like Lilongwe, Blantyre didn’t hold much interest for us (although the queues of unmanned cars waiting for petrol were possibly longer). Malawi is beautiful with its mountainous landscape and gorgeous lake but it’s a mess, and apparently things have got progessively worse over the last year or so. There’s still no petrol, the cost of the little food that there is is extortionate and good luck trying to get any foreign currency.

One of our favourite things in Malawi (after baobab trees) - Cherryplum and Cocopina Sobo!

One of our favourite things in Malawi (after baobab trees) - Cherryplum and Cocopina Sobo!

So we decided to get out of there and head to the border for challenge – I mean country – number six, Mozambique.

Tete, a nondescript and ridiculously expensive mining town, was the first major town on our way towards the coast. After resigning ourselves to the fact that our basic room with communal bathroom was going to cost more than our room in Zanzibar, we dumped our bags and went in search of lunch. That’s where Tete redeemed itself a little because my frango (grilled Portuguese chicken), custard tart and proper Portuguese Delta coffee were all delicious!

But my happiness didn’t last long. As my dad had been stationed in Tete while he was in the army, I thought I’d take some pictures for him. As we were walking down the street, we were stopped by two policemen, one of them quite a lot more obstinate than his colleague. He began harrassing me in Portuguese about my entry stamp (as a South African I don’t need a visa) and we weren’t quite sure how things were going to turn out (he was rude and obstructive as he wouldn’t explain what needed to be done to solve the non-existent problem. Of course he wanted money but he wasn’t going to get any from us). Thankfully, a young local guy stopped and asked me in perfect English whether the police were harrassing me. He then went over to the nasty little policeman and I’m not sure what was said, but the policeman soon left us alone after telling Alberto that there was an issue with my entry stamp.Whatever. One thing you learn in Africa – NEVER trust a policeman.

The excitement for the day wasn’t to end there. The joys of Mozambican travel involve at least six hours on cramped and old buses that depart – this is the best bit – at 4am. We thought we’d be clever and go to bed at 8pm to be up in seven hours. However, seven hours later, we were still awake. The noise of the traffic and the music of the cars as they sped past and the people shouting/talking in the street below meant neither of us got any sleep.

The next morning got off to an even better start. Upon arrival at the bus station just before 4am, we found out that our bus driver hadn’t turned up for work. We were then all shoved onto another bus and left for Chimoio at 4.30am. Ok, could be worse we thought. And then it did get worse because the music started on our bus that was to become a travelling nightclub. And it blared from 4.30am (nevermind most of the bus was trying to sleep) until we got off six hours later. At this point, we were ready to get the next plane to Joburg.

But then we arrived at the Pink Papaya (and yip, almost everything in the house is pink but you don’t notice that after a while :-p), a German owned and run guesthouse in the quiet town of Chimoio and what a difference it made to the way we felt! Anja, our host, was brilliant and did more than enough to make us feel welcome and comfortable and soon we felt ourselves relax. We spent three days catching up on washing (some of our clothes got washed in a machine for the first time in three and a half months thanks to Anja!), eating awesome chicken from the churrasqueira and we even finally got a chance to cook vegetables (we’ve missed them!) for ourselves in the guesthouse kitchen.

The good times at Pink Papaya came to an end all too soon and it was time again for another early morning bus, this time to Vilanculos. Thankfully, there were no speakers on this bus. Soon we would be on the coast.

I think we were pretty spoilt with the beaches in Zanzibar because we weren’t all that impressed with the beach at Vilanculos. However, we did do a day trip out to Magaruque Island, which is part of the Bazaruto Archipelago, and that was beautiful. We almost had the whole island nevermind just the beach to ourselves.

Magaruque Island, Bazaruto Archipelago

Magaruque Island, Bazaruto Archipelago

The beach at Magaruque

The beach at Magaruque

Onde esta Wally en Magaruque? (Where's Wally at Magaruque?)

Onde esta Wally en Magaruque? (Where's Wally at Magaruque?)

From there it was on to Tofo via minibus, a rather choppy ferry crossing on a dodgy little boat and then another minibus. I think that quite a long time ago the beach at Tofo was probably beautiful but sadly now it’s been spoilt by the many guesthouses, hotels, restaurants and bars that have been built along its shores.

Tofo beach

Tofo beach

We just spent the weekend at Tofo and then took the bus back to Inhambane, a pleasant and quiet little town (and long ago important trading port) with evident Portuguese and Arabic architectural influence, about 20km away. I liked it there.

18th century cathedral in Inhambane

18th century cathedral in Inhambane

One of many old buidlings in Inhambane

I thought the old Beetle complemented the old building quite nicely :-)

How do you like . . .

How do you like . . .

. . . d'em coconuts?

. . . d'em coconuts?

A sunset swim in Inhambane

A sunset swim in Inhambane

And then on to the big one – Maputo. I suppose my sister and I have this city to thank for our existence – my mom and dad met on the steps of the cathedral one weekend over 35 years ago :-)

Maputo!

Maputo!

My mom and dad met on these very cathedral steps

My mom and dad met on these very cathedral steps

The Maputo railway station

The beautiful Maputo railway station

If you can avoid twisting your ankle or falling down an uncovered manhole while trying to navigate the broken pavements and can get past the litter that lines some of the main streets, it’s a pretty cool city. Yesterday we hired a tuk-tuk\taxi thing to take us for a ride along the Avenida Marginal to see the beach at Costa do Sol and finished up by treating ourselves to high tea at the Polana (darling).

Breakfast in the city

Breakfast in the city

Our ride for the afternoon

Our ride for the afternoon

Grilling chicken along the Costa do Sol

Grilling chicken along the Costa do Sol

Here you go Dad, the 'lemon squeezer' cathedral

Here you go Dad, the 'lemon squeezer' cathedral

I say, a spot of afternoon tea and cake at the Polana (one of the oldest and flashest hotels in Maputo)

I say, a spot of afternoon tea and cake at the Polana (one of the oldest and flashest hotels in Maputo)

Maputo’s a city I definitely wouldn’t mind coming back to visit as I’d love to explore it some more and experience the fish market where you choose fresh fish and then have it grilled and to wander around the markets, probably to buy more textiles!

I can’t help but wonder what my dad would think of Mozambique now after all the years he spent here?
In memory of my grandfather. I hope he has found some peace.



Chizimulu and Likoma islands
March 7, 2012, 7:20 pm
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Round about now we should have been in Cape Maclear in the south having travelled there on the MV Ilala ferry but instead we’re in Lilongwe after a nine hour bus ride, but more about that later . . .

It’s been a pretty eventful two weeks in Malawi so far. They started with a lengthy journey from Zanzibar all the way across to Karonga, our first stop. There’s not much to see or do in Karonga but the locals are friendly and the children even more so (the afternoon we arrived we were walking back to our guesthouse from town along the paths in the village and as we passed a group of kids, one of them – not more than three years old – came hurtling out of the group and flung his arms around my legs and looked up at me with a massive grin on his face. The manager from our guesthouse was with us at the time and he’d only just been explaining that the children are afraid of Westerners but this little guy obviously wasn’t)! The kids are beautiful and full of smiles, I can kind of see why Madonna adopted one . . .

Our next stop (another frustrating day on buses) was Nkhata Bay where two things happened mainly – I damaged my foot and it rained, a lot. While I was resting my bandaged and swollen foot, poor Alberto had to do the 30 minute walk to town in the rain for water supplies – he also came back with much needed chocolate :-)

We decided to do a kayaking trip to Chizimulu and Likoma, two small islands a few hours by ferry from Nkhata Bay – four days of kayaking around the islands, camping on the beaches and enjoying island life seemed like a good way to cheer ourselves up, and I could still be active without moving my foot much.

Along with Kumbu, our guide, and Ruurd, a Dutch guy we’d met at the backpackers, we boarded the packed Ilala ferry last Monday evening at about 8pm for the less than 100km trip to Chizimulu (affectionately known as Chizzie). As we weren’t going far, we bought second class tickets and spent an uncomfortable ferry ride wedged on the front deck between lots of people and their produce, together with planks of wood and sheets of metal and who knows what else. Things got interesting when we tried to find space to lie down and were constantly being woken up by people standing on you and feeling people’s feet in your backside while others played blaring music on their phones. Nice.

4,5 hours later it was finally time to try get off (without being shoved) the ferry in the dark onto the little boat that was waiting alongside to take us across to Wakwenda Retreat, where we’d be camping for the first two nights. After being shown around in the dark (there’s very limited electricity on Chizzie so it had been turned off long before we arrived that night) by Bjorn, the South African guy helping out at Wakwenda, we pitched our tent in the dark and fell asleep in the early hours just before the rain started.

Wakwenda Retreat, Chizi (the bar used to be inside the boabab)

Wakwenda Retreat, Chizzie (the bar used to be inside the boabab)

On Tuesday morning it was still raining and we soon discovered the many creatures that live at the lodge, including the frogs (an animal that freaks me out), the bat who sleeps wrapped around the shower head, the colourful lizards that scurry around the bar area looking for food and the resident dogs.

Interesting animals aside, Wakwenda Retreat is a special little place built next to the small fishing village on Chizzie. Formerly a government lodge (there’s hardly any phone reception on Chizzie so to contact anyone, you need to phone the little post office – up the steps on a hill from Wakwenda – and tell the guys there who you’d like to speak to or leave a message for them), the current English owner has been there for 17 years and I can’t imagine that there are ever very many people staying there at one time. It’s the perfect place to escape to, the locals rely on the ferry to get supplies from the mainland twice a week and the nearest ‘town’ is on Likoma, 12km away (or two hours by kayak in our case) across the lake.

Wakwenda also possibly has the coolest bar I’ve ever seen. Previously in the trunk of an enormous boabab tree (the islands are dotted with boababs everywhere), the bar was moved to one end of the lodge a few years ago and is now spread out on different levels with lots of secret spots to sit and chill or swim and snorkel in the clear water below – definitely an awesome spot to easily lose a few days.

Possibly the coolest bar ever - Wakky's Bar at Wakwenda

Possibly the coolest bar ever - Wakky's Bar at Wakwenda

Once the rain cleared later that morning, the kayaking trip began. The next four days (plus one rest day, although we did an 11,5km walk in the heat around Likoma so it wasn’t all that restful) were brilliant. We kayaked and snorkelled around Chizzie and then kayaked on to Likoma – quite a bit bigger than Chizzie with a very small town selling supplies and a few (around seven) cars and motorbikes. We spent three days exploring different parts of the island, stopping for lunch on beautiful stretches of beach surrounded by boababs or with Mozambique just across the lake and were visited by curious local children wondering what were up to in their part of the world.

Check out those strokes!

Check out those strokes!

Working the waves

Working the waves

The distance we kayaked - Chizzie (in the background) to Likoma

The distance we kayaked - Chizzie (in the background) to Likoma

Local kids providing entertainment on Likoma

Local kids providing entertainment on Likoma

One of our lunch spots - with Mozambique within paddling distance just behind us

One of our lunch spots - with Mozambique within paddling distance just behind us

We camped on the beach for one night and then stayed at Mango Drift, another great little place, for our last two nights. Our arrival at Mango Drift was a pretty hairy one – as we paddled round the last point before reaching the lodge, the lake got quite rough and it was as if we were battling the waves in the sea and not Lake Malawi. I of course thought it was brilliant and loved being thrown about in the kayak (possibly because I had Kumbu steering our kayak in the seat behind me) but I don’t think Alberto liked it as much as their kayak was filling up with water a little too quickly and they had to stabilise it every ten minutes to empty it.

Our beach camping spot on one side of Likoma

Our beach camping spot on one side of Likoma

View from the bar at Mango Drift

View from the bar at Mango Drift

Resting sore muscles at Mango Drift

Resting sore muscles and contemplating stuff (well, not really)

A Mango Drift sunset

A Mango Drift sunset

On Saturday evening we were due to get the ferry from Likoma to take us to Chizzie for two days while we waited for the southbound service to Monkey Bay on Monday, and Kumbu would continue on to Nkhata Bay with the kayaks. However, on Saturday morning we woke up to be told that the ferry was suddenly not running and no-one knew when it would next be expected. Not such a major problem for us as we could paddle back to Chizzie to join the rest of the group who’d come over from Nkhata to Wakwenda and arrange a local boat back, but for the locals on these two islands, they rely on the ferry for supplies and food for their families and their businesses. Apparently the ferry company often takes it out of service (sometimes without prior warning) and people are never sure when it will resume its schedule.

The walk to Likoma town

The walk to Likoma town

Alberto found a new friend

Alberto found a new friend

Kumbu, our kayakmaster and good chef

Kumbu, our kayakmaster and great chef

So after another night at Wakwenda (which we didn’t mind as it meant we got to appreciate the location of the bar and have a swim), we piled into a local boat (10 wazungu – white people – and 15 locals plus chickens, a couple of puppies, babies and luggage) on Sunday morning to bring us back to Nkhata Bay. Six hours later, sunburnt, tired, drenched (the waves were pretty rough at times and this time it wasn’t so fun) and with a bag full of wet clothes and a phone that no longer works, we arrived.

And we pretty much didn’t move until our 5am alarm this morning to get the bus to Lilongwe. There’s not a lot happening in Lilongwe (except I got quite excited at seeing so many South African brands in the supermarkets) and it’s expensive so it’s another early alarm tomorrow for another bus to Blantyre – oh, the joys of travelling!



De Zanzibar a Malawi
March 5, 2012, 5:42 am
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Tras Zanzibar nos esperaba uno de los tramos largos del viaje, cuatro días hasta el próximo lugar lo bastante agradable como para descansar un tiempo. El trayecto nos llevaría con ferry, tren y autobús desde Stone Town en Zanzibar hasta Nkatha Bay en Malawi.

En Stone Town nos despertamos temprano para coger el ferry de vuelta a Dar Es Salaam. El viaje en el ferry es bastante agradable, el único barco moderno que hemos visto hasta ahora. Nos acomodámos al aire en la parte de atrás y aprovechamos para leer, oir música y broncearnos un poco.

El moderno ferry entre Zanzibar y Dar Es Salaam

El moderno ferry entre Zanzibar y Dar Es Salaam

Llegamos a Dar Es Salaam a tiempo de buscar un restaurante para comer a una hora razonable. El sitio que parecía más prometedor en la Lonely Planet había desaparecido y en su lugar había un bloque de oficinas en construcción, así que nos arriesgamos a entrar a un restaurante bastante local de esos en los que no hablan mucho inglés. Tenía aire acondicionado, algo que no hemos visto fuera de Dar Es Salaam, y una bendición con el calor que hace allí.

La línea de tren de Tazara (Tanzania-Zambia Railways) es una de las líneas de tren que se construyeron durante el periodo colonial para conectar el interior del continente con la costa, y una de las pocas con mantenimiento y en buen estado. Conecta Dar Es Salaam con Mbeya, a menos de 100km de Malawi, y luego continua hasta Zambia. Para este viaje compramos un compartimento de para nosotros dos, que luego como nos sobraban dos camas compartiríamos con un par de chicas alemanas que estaban de estudiantes en Dar Es Salaam.

El tren en sí era bastante viejo, chino de segunda mano producido en los 60, seguramente, pero las camas eran suficientemente cómodas e iba razonablemente rápido. El embrague era un poco brusco y cada vez que frenaba o arrancaba parecía que habíamos atropellado una vaca, pero el paisaje por las ventanas compensaba por todo esto.

La estación de tren TAZARA

La estación de tren TAZARA

El tren TAZARA en dirección a Mbeya

El tren TAZARA en dirección a Mbeya

Disfrutando del viaje en tren

Disfrutando del viaje en tren

El tren atraviesa una enorme área del sur de Tanzania muy poco poblada, con vistas hacia la jungla y las montañas, y dicen que si vienes en dirección contraria pasas durante el día por tramos en los que puedes ver elefantes y cebras. Tras dormir en el tren y pasar la mañana tomando fotos y escuchando música llegamos a Mbeya, rodeado de montañas y mucho más fresquito que Dar Es Salaam.

Mbeya desde el tren

Mbeya desde el tren

Apilamos nuestras mochilas en un Daladala (minibus) para hacer los 4km en dirección al centro y al llegar a nuestro destino en un bache se abrió el portón y mi mochila se cayó en medio del tráfico. Afortunadamente la recuperé tras pegarle un par de leches al ayudante de conductor que no se había dado cuenta y no abría la puerta. Para otro día me queda hablar del poco cuidado que ponen en hacer las cosas por aquí.

Esa tarde otra vez el hotel descrito en la Lonely Planet no estaba en la calle indicada, así que nos alojamos otra vez en un hotel con nombre exótico (tras el maravilloso “cabrón caliente” de Masaka), ¡el Hotel Sombrero!

¡El Hotel Sombrero!

¡El Hotel Sombrero!

Esa noche cenamos la que probablemente será nuestra última cena de comida india hasta Durban, en Sudáfrica, y a la mañana siguiente nos montamos en una serie de autobuses hasta llegar a la frontera con Malawi. En uno de estos autobuses al arrastrar mi mochila para colocarla en el maletero la engancharon en una plancha de metal y me hicieron dos sietes en la cubierta impermeable, segundo ejemplo del poco cuidado que se pone con las cosas aquí. Nadie se disculpó siquiera.

En fin, caminamos del autobús un par de kilómetros a la frontera, guiados por un par de señores de estos que se dedican a cambiar moneda y con poca novedad cambiamos de país. Como detalle interesante el dinero en Malawi es enorme. El bilete de mayor denominación son 500 Kwachas, o dos euros, si para cada día aquí necesitamos unas 10000 Kwachas significa que vamos a todas partes con gruesos fajos de billetes.

Songwe River, la frontera entre Tanzania y Malawi

Songwe River, la frontera entre Tanzania y Malawi

Al otro lado de la frontera cogimos un taxi a Karonga, por dos euros cada uno que la verdad nos pareció caro para lo que estamos acostumbrados, y cuando llegamos a Karonga y nos pusimos a buscar habitación nos encontramos con que los hoteles eran mucho más caros que en Tanzania, y mucho peores. Parece ser que ese rumor de que Malawi era barato no es cierto, y una vez más tenemos que vigilar cuánto gastamos.

En Karonga pasamos la noche a orillas del lago Malawi, en un hotel muy grande y muy decrépito del que éramos los únicos huéspedes. Con poco que hacer nos fuimos a dormir temprano y a las cinco y media de la mañana siguiente estabamos ya despiertos y listos para el último día de viaje antes de descansar en Nkatha Bay.

Campos de arroz en Karonga

Campos de arroz en Karonga

Lake Malawi en Karonga

Lake Malawi en Karonga

Ese día sólo teníamos tres horas y media en autobús y luego otra hora en minibús, no mucho en teoría. Al autobús llegamos a las siete y media, y esperamos durante dos horas a que se llenara de pasajeros para partir. Las tres horas y media eran en realidad cinco, y el resultado es que llegamos a Mzuzu, de donde salía el minibus para Nkatha Bay, a las dos y media de la tarde, y cansadísimos.

El minibus a Nkatha Bay fue rápido e indoloro, pero el cansancio de los pasados cuatro días pesaba mucho. Nos quedaba caminar un kilómetro cuesta arriba en un calor intenso hasta el hotel, y bajando las escaleras del mismo Simone puso el pie mal y se hizo daño en los tendones.

Por suerte habíamos llegado, y desde entonces hemos estado descansando y esperando a que su pie mejore (la hinchazón se le bajó al día siguiente, y ya está casi bien del todo). Además la estación lluviosa ha llegado a Malawi, y ha estado lloviendo desde que llegamos, así que de todas maneras no tenemos mucho que hacer.

Nkatha Bay

Nkatha Bay

Recuperándose del accidente, pero ya mejor

Recuperándose del accidente, pero ya mejor



Another rewind – a taste of Swahili cooking
March 4, 2012, 8:11 pm
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We tasted some really good pilau while in Tanzania and wanted to learn how to make it ourselves. So early one Sunday morning, Simai from KV Tours met us at our guesthouse to take us to Dharajani market to get the ingredients for our lunch. We’d chosen to make boiled fish with pilau and sweet bananas with coconut milk for dessert.

From the market we drove out to one of the villages on the outskirts of Stone Town and in a very basic but authentic set-up, began the necessary preparation to create our culinary delights.

We had a great day cooking, drinking coconut water from fresh coconuts, eating (a lot) and chatting with Simai, who is the young director of KV Tours. He’s a really switched on guy with a lot of initiative and a big focus of his business is to involve the local community through employment and participation so that they too benefit from the tours and services he offers.

Buying fish at Dharajani

Buying fish at Dharajani

Pilau ingredients

Pilau ingredients

Hard at work

Hard at work

Smiley Simai

Smiley Simai

Enjoying fresh coconut water

Enjoying fresh coconut water

Alberto working the coconut to get the milk for our dessert

Alberto working the coconut to get the milk for our dessert

The end result - it was delicious (if we don't mind saying so ourselves)

The end result - it was delicious (if we don't mind saying so ourselves)

The right way to do lunch

The right way to do lunch

Here’s the recipe in case you fancied trying it yourself:

Boiled fish with pilau

Ingredients(serves at least 4):

3/4 kg rice
4 medium potatoes
2 small red onions
3 small garlic heads
salt
cardamom (1/3 of a packet)
1 packet of whole cinnamon
1/2 packet of ground cinnamon
1 packet of cumin seeds
1/2 packet of black peppercorns
vegetable cooking oil
meaty fish / beef (use ginger with beef when boiling – helps to tenderise meat) / chicken

Method:

Cut fish into big chunks and boil in water with salt, garlic and lime.

For the pilau:
Peel and mash the garlic cloves
Peel and slice onions into rings
Peel and cut potatoes in half
Wash cumin seeds and leave them soaking in a mug of water
Wash rice and drain

Brown onions in the oil, when brown add the garlic and fry for 30s, then add the potatoes and the dry spices and fry for a minute or so until the potatoes are well covered. Add the mug with the cumin seeds and the fish broth, when it boils add half litre of water.

When boiling again add rice and keep stirring until most of the water is absorbed, put meat or fish on top, cover with the rice (so it doesn’t dry out) and then place in oven for 10-15 minutes.

And the tasty accompaniment:

Kachumbari

1 red onion – slice thin and squeeze with water and salt until soft, discard water.
1 chilli – deseed and slice thin
4 small tomatoes, 1 cucumber, 1 carrot, 1 green pepper – chop thin.
The juice of 3 limes, a bit of water and salt – mix together until the salt dissolves.

Mix all together and let rest while cooking the pilau.

Enjoy!



Rewind – Further wanderings in Stone Town
March 4, 2012, 7:18 pm
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* 04/03/2012 – sorry for the lack of updates lately but we’re now back from a week of kayaking around Chizimulu and Likoma islands (both absolutely beautiful spots) in Lake Malawi so am playing catch up. We’ll get back on track with the posts soon!

We left the beach and headed back to Stone Town by ‘daladala’ (a form of local transport which is basically a semi-open van with benches running along both sides of the back and the aim of the game is to see how many people and their belongings you can squeeze in – we started our journey hanging on to the railings at the back of the van still carrying our backpacks but fortunately soon got seats for the rest of the hour long trip).

I was pretty excited to get back to Stone Town and we spent a further three days getting lost along more alleyways, enjoying good food (there’s a lovely little place behind the main post office called Lazuli where we had lunch twice. It’s owned by a South African woman and her Zanzibari husband – their baby is one of the chubbiest I’ve seen in ages – and I tucked into their version of a bunny chow – not nearly as amazing as a proper Durban bunny chow but still quite tasty and very decoratively arranged), taking yet more pictures of Zanzibar doors and happily indulging in my obsession of buying brightly coloured textiles, which I’ve yet to decide what to do with them.

Lazuli's version of a bunny chow

Lazuli's version of a bunny chow

More Lazuli loveliness - passion fruit and vanilla soda

More Lazuli loveliness - passion fruit and vanilla soda

We also did a bit of cultural sightseeing including a rather depressing visit to the site of the former slave trade market (ashamedly a practice introduced to Zanzibar by the Portuguese in the 16th century) where we were shown the small, dark underground cells the men, women and children were kept in while waiting to be sold (well, those that were strong enough to survive in the first place) and took a walk up the winding staircases of the House of Wonders, one of the most prominent buildings in the old town, built in the 1880s as a ceremonial palace. It was the first building to have electricity and a lift (which I don’t think works anymore) in 1913.

Here a few more snapshots:

Further wanderings in Stone Town

Further wanderings in Stone Town

A typical Stone Town alleyway

A typical Stone Town alleyway

More lovely Zanzibar doors, sadly a lot of them in disrepair

More lovely Zanzibar doors, sadly a lot of them in disrepair

The perfect spot for a cold one

The perfect spot for a cold one

The monument to the slaves

The monument to the slaves

Views of Stone Town from the balcony of the House of Wonders

View of Stone Town from the balcony of the House of Wonders

The House of Wonders and the Old Fort at dusk

The House of Wonders and the Old Fort at dusk

The delights of the Forodhani Gardens food market

The delights of the Forodhani Gardens food market